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419 bytes added ,  15:35, 20 October 2019
→‎Linux: "composite" "disable" no longer works - thx Mario!
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# For Linux, a Nvidia 3D vision emitter "workaround" requires the DIN 3-pin connector found on the high end Quadros and [http://www.nuvision3d.com/the60gx.html NuVision] or [http://www.reald-corporate.com/scientific CrystalEyes] stereo glasses and emitter. The 3-pin DIN cable is difficult to find if you do not have one, and it is recommended that you splice your own. This author purchased a 3-pin mini-DIN connector here: [http://www.vetco.net/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=6588], spliced it onto a 2.5mm stereo audio cable like from here: [http://www.vetco.net/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=6952], using information adapted from this page explaining how to adapt connections for the older VESA standard for stereo here: [http://www.stereo3d.com/vesa3.htm] (it works quite well). The Figures on [https://forums.geforce.com/default/topic/411219/3d-vision/3d-vision-vesa-cable/7/] or [https://forums.geforce.com/default/topic/513899/3d-vision/link-nvidia-3d-vision-kit-with-dlp-display-projector-connection-problem-with-vesa-stereo-cable-ir-tr/] show details on connecting the plugs. Note that the 5V power line does ''not'' need to be connected as the receiver is powered by USB.  
 
# For Linux, a Nvidia 3D vision emitter "workaround" requires the DIN 3-pin connector found on the high end Quadros and [http://www.nuvision3d.com/the60gx.html NuVision] or [http://www.reald-corporate.com/scientific CrystalEyes] stereo glasses and emitter. The 3-pin DIN cable is difficult to find if you do not have one, and it is recommended that you splice your own. This author purchased a 3-pin mini-DIN connector here: [http://www.vetco.net/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=6588], spliced it onto a 2.5mm stereo audio cable like from here: [http://www.vetco.net/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=6952], using information adapted from this page explaining how to adapt connections for the older VESA standard for stereo here: [http://www.stereo3d.com/vesa3.htm] (it works quite well). The Figures on [https://forums.geforce.com/default/topic/411219/3d-vision/3d-vision-vesa-cable/7/] or [https://forums.geforce.com/default/topic/513899/3d-vision/link-nvidia-3d-vision-kit-with-dlp-display-projector-connection-problem-with-vesa-stereo-cable-ir-tr/] show details on connecting the plugs. Note that the 5V power line does ''not'' need to be connected as the receiver is powered by USB.  
 
# The most affordable NVIDIA 3D Vision solution on Linux used to be a monitor with built-in IR emitter (for example BenQ XL2420TX or ASUS VG278HR), and a cheap Quadro, e.g. the K420 or FX380. The latter has a Dual-Link DVI (DVI-D) and a Displayport outlet, so can drive the stereo monitor, and an additional monitor. This solution avoids the USB/3-pin hassle altogether. See below for xorg.conf! GeForce cards (instead of Quadro) ''do not give openGL Quad Buffered Stereo'' on Linux (on Windows neither). Unfortunately, monitors with built-in IR emitter are seemingly no longer produced (2017).
 
# The most affordable NVIDIA 3D Vision solution on Linux used to be a monitor with built-in IR emitter (for example BenQ XL2420TX or ASUS VG278HR), and a cheap Quadro, e.g. the K420 or FX380. The latter has a Dual-Link DVI (DVI-D) and a Displayport outlet, so can drive the stereo monitor, and an additional monitor. This solution avoids the USB/3-pin hassle altogether. See below for xorg.conf! GeForce cards (instead of Quadro) ''do not give openGL Quad Buffered Stereo'' on Linux (on Windows neither). Unfortunately, monitors with built-in IR emitter are seemingly no longer produced (2017).
# [http://www.nvidia.com/object/3d-vision-displays.html The Nvidia page that names monitors with built-in emitter] also has not changed for years. http://geizhals.eu/?cat=monlcd19wide now has a "inkl. 3D-emitter" attribute. This currently only returns the Asus 278HR which can only be bought in Poland, or through EBay.
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# [http://www.nvidia.com/object/3d-vision-displays.html The Nvidia page that names monitors with built-in emitter] is not up-to-date; in particular, monitors with built-in emitter are no longer being produced (potentially can be bought on EBay or so). http://geizhals.eu/?cat=monlcd19wide has a "3D-fähig" (3D-capable) attribute.
 
# Cheap Quadros (e.g. K420) with DVI-I Dual-Link Connector (DVI-I DL / DVI-D) or DisplayPort work well. Make sure the card can do dual-link DVI if your monitor has only DVI-D input. Any card (including the "Windows only" ones!) [http://www.nvidia.com/object/3d-vision-pro-requirements.html#Quadro listed] should work if a) it can do dual-link DVI if the monitor has only DVI-D input, and b) if the monitor has built-in emitter. The DisplayPort 1.2 (Quadro) to DisplayPort 1.2 (monitor) connection works well (e.g. with the BenQ XL2420TX).
 
# Cheap Quadros (e.g. K420) with DVI-I Dual-Link Connector (DVI-I DL / DVI-D) or DisplayPort work well. Make sure the card can do dual-link DVI if your monitor has only DVI-D input. Any card (including the "Windows only" ones!) [http://www.nvidia.com/object/3d-vision-pro-requirements.html#Quadro listed] should work if a) it can do dual-link DVI if the monitor has only DVI-D input, and b) if the monitor has built-in emitter. The DisplayPort 1.2 (Quadro) to DisplayPort 1.2 (monitor) connection works well (e.g. with the BenQ XL2420TX).
 
# To connect a DVI-D monitor to ar Quadro with DisplayPort 1.2, you will need a Club-3D CAC-1051 active DisplayPort/Dual-Link DVI Adapter 330MHz (110 €: do not buy the cheaper 270 MHz model, it will not work because the bandwidth is too low for 1920x1080@120hz) or for cards with miniDisplay ports, the Club-3D CAC-1151 active miniDisplayPort/Dual-Link DVI Adapter 330MHz.
 
# To connect a DVI-D monitor to ar Quadro with DisplayPort 1.2, you will need a Club-3D CAC-1051 active DisplayPort/Dual-Link DVI Adapter 330MHz (110 €: do not buy the cheaper 270 MHz model, it will not work because the bandwidth is too low for 1920x1080@120hz) or for cards with miniDisplay ports, the Club-3D CAC-1151 active miniDisplayPort/Dual-Link DVI Adapter 330MHz.
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     Option        "Stereo" "10"
 
     Option        "Stereo" "10"
 
     Option        "nvidiaXineramaInfoOrder" "DFP-0"
 
     Option        "nvidiaXineramaInfoOrder" "DFP-0"
     Option        "metamodes" "DVI-I-1: 1920x1080_120 +0+0, DP-1: nvidia-auto-select
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     Option        "metamodes" "DVI-I-1: 1920x1080_120 +0+0, DP-1: nvidia-auto-select +1920+0"
+1920+0"
   
     Option        "SLI" "Off"
 
     Option        "SLI" "Off"
 
     Option        "MultiGPU" "Off"
 
     Option        "MultiGPU" "Off"
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This should be enough to get stereo working. However, note that there is a major issue on linux with window compositing causing stereo images to display improperly. This is a problem with the window display manager, and is not inherent to Xorg or NVidia. If you try to turn on stereo in Coot in a display manager that makes use of the Xorg compositing extension (e.g., Gnome3, or Unity in Ubuntu) then what you will see when you activate hardware stereo is a slight rotation of the view, but stereo remains disabled. In order to get around this problem, you must use a display manager that does not make use of compositing as part of its eye candy. This author has found the MATE desktop to work quite well for this purpose (and may in fact be one of the few that still does not use software compositing by default). Note that you ''do not'' need to disable the Compositing extension in the Xorg configuration file to make this work -- this will allow you to switch back to Gnome3, Unity, etc when you don't need stereo if you prefer! Not disabling the window compositing extension globally allows for a more flexible setup depending on your preferred workflow.
 
This should be enough to get stereo working. However, note that there is a major issue on linux with window compositing causing stereo images to display improperly. This is a problem with the window display manager, and is not inherent to Xorg or NVidia. If you try to turn on stereo in Coot in a display manager that makes use of the Xorg compositing extension (e.g., Gnome3, or Unity in Ubuntu) then what you will see when you activate hardware stereo is a slight rotation of the view, but stereo remains disabled. In order to get around this problem, you must use a display manager that does not make use of compositing as part of its eye candy. This author has found the MATE desktop to work quite well for this purpose (and may in fact be one of the few that still does not use software compositing by default). Note that you ''do not'' need to disable the Compositing extension in the Xorg configuration file to make this work -- this will allow you to switch back to Gnome3, Unity, etc when you don't need stereo if you prefer! Not disabling the window compositing extension globally allows for a more flexible setup depending on your preferred workflow.
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The update of RHEL7 to 7.6 broke our /etc/X11/xorg.conf . It needs now
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        Section "Extensions"
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          Option    "COMPOSITE" "Off"
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        EndSection
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instead of
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        Section "Extensions"
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          Option    "Composite" "Disable"
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        EndSection
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The old version still works with KDE, but no longer with MATE. Thanks to Dirk Kostrewa for pointing this out!
    
===Mac OS X===
 
===Mac OS X===
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http://pymolwiki.org/index.php/Stereo_3D_Display_Options
 
http://pymolwiki.org/index.php/Stereo_3D_Display_Options
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https://sbgrid.org/wiki/usage/stereo
1,313

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