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1,230 bytes added ,  18:57, 17 February 2017
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[[Zalman Stereo]] is supported by [[Coot]]; no drivers or other software must be installed.
 
[[Zalman Stereo]] is supported by [[Coot]]; no drivers or other software must be installed.
   −
NVidia 3D Vision and 3D Vision 2: Requires the appropriate hardware as detailed above. With the NVidia proprietary graphics drivers installed, 3D Vision will work with a few minor tweaks. The Xorg configuration file needs to be edited (usually located at /etc/X11/xorg.conf -- see [http://us.download.nvidia.com/XFree86/Linux-x86_64/346.35/README/xconfigoptions.html] for more information) to recognize that the NVidia 3D vision receiver is connected. This is done by adding an option for stereo mode under the section labeled "Screen":
+
NVidia 3D Vision and 3D Vision 2: Requires the appropriate hardware as detailed above. With the NVidia proprietary graphics drivers installed, 3D Vision will work with a few minor tweaks. The Xorg configuration file (usually located at /etc/X11/xorg.conf) must be adapted.
    Section "Screen"
+
# It can be edited -- see [http://us.download.nvidia.com/XFree86/Linux-x86_64/346.35/README/xconfigoptions.html] for more information), or
      Option      "Stereo" "10"
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# <code>nvidia-settings</code> could be run, or
      ---------(etc) ----------
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# <code>nvidia-xconfig --stereo=10</code> (The value of 10 is specific to the 3D Vision system)
    EndSection
     −
The value of 10 is specific to the 3D Vision system. This process can also be done in a single step by running the following command as root:
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The resulting xorg.conf has an option for stereo mode under the section labeled "Device" in this minimal example:
     [~]# nvidia-xconfig --stereo=10
+
<pre>
 +
Section "Device"
 +
    Identifier    "Device0"
 +
    Driver        "nvidia"
 +
    VendorName    "NVIDIA Corporation"
 +
    Option "Stereo" "10"
 +
EndSection
 +
</pre>
 +
The following is a longer example, for a dual-monitor setup - this was generated with <code>nvidia-settings</code> and has the stereo option in the "Screen" section::
 +
 
 +
<pre>
 +
Section "Monitor"
 +
    Identifier    "Monitor0"
 +
    VendorName    "Unknown"
 +
    ModelName      "BenQ XL2420TX"
 +
     HorizSync      30.0 - 140.0
 +
    VertRefresh    56.0 - 120.0
 +
EndSection
 +
 
 +
Section "Device"
 +
    Identifier    "Videocard0"
 +
    Driver        "nvidia"
 +
EndSection
 +
 
 +
Section "Device"
 +
    Identifier    "Device0"
 +
    Driver        "nvidia"
 +
    VendorName    "NVIDIA Corporation"
 +
    BoardName      "Quadro K420"
 +
EndSection
 +
 
 +
Section "Screen"
 +
    Identifier    "Default Screen"
 +
    Device        "Videocard0"
 +
EndSection
 +
 
 +
Section "Screen"
 +
    Identifier    "Screen0"
 +
    Device        "Device0"
 +
    Monitor        "Monitor0"
 +
    DefaultDepth    24
 +
    Option        "Stereo" "10"
 +
    Option        "nvidiaXineramaInfoOrder" "DFP-0"
 +
    Option        "metamodes" "DVI-I-1: 1920x1080_120 +0+0, DP-1: nvidia-auto-select
 +
+1920+0"
 +
    Option        "SLI" "Off"
 +
    Option        "MultiGPU" "Off"
 +
    Option        "BaseMosaic" "off"
 +
    SubSection    "Display"
 +
        Depth      24
 +
    EndSubSection
 +
EndSection
 +
</pre>
    
This should be enough to get stereo working. However, note that there is a major issue on linux with window compositing causing stereo images to display improperly. This is a problem with the window display manager, and is not inherent to Xorg or NVidia. If you try to turn on stereo in Coot in a display manager that makes use of the Xorg compositing extension (e.g., Gnome3, or Unity in Ubuntu) then what you will see when you activate hardware stereo is a slight rotation of the view, but stereo remains disabled. In order to get around this problem, you must use a display manager that does not make use of compositing as part of its eye candy. This author has found the MATE desktop to work quite well for this purpose (and may in fact be one of the few that still does not use software compositing by default). Note that you ''do not'' need to disable the Compositing extension in the Xorg configuration file to make this work -- this will allow you to switch back to Gnome3, Unity, etc when you don't need stereo if you prefer! Not disabling the window compositing extension globally allows for a more flexible setup depending on your preferred workflow.
 
This should be enough to get stereo working. However, note that there is a major issue on linux with window compositing causing stereo images to display improperly. This is a problem with the window display manager, and is not inherent to Xorg or NVidia. If you try to turn on stereo in Coot in a display manager that makes use of the Xorg compositing extension (e.g., Gnome3, or Unity in Ubuntu) then what you will see when you activate hardware stereo is a slight rotation of the view, but stereo remains disabled. In order to get around this problem, you must use a display manager that does not make use of compositing as part of its eye candy. This author has found the MATE desktop to work quite well for this purpose (and may in fact be one of the few that still does not use software compositing by default). Note that you ''do not'' need to disable the Compositing extension in the Xorg configuration file to make this work -- this will allow you to switch back to Gnome3, Unity, etc when you don't need stereo if you prefer! Not disabling the window compositing extension globally allows for a more flexible setup depending on your preferred workflow.
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